المراجع

مصادر رئيسية

  • Marcus Nathan Adler (trans.), The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela (New York: Philipp Feldheim, 1907).
  • R. J. C. Broadhurst (trans.), Travels of Ibn Jubayr (London: Jonathan Cape, 1952).
  • Charles Burnett (trans. & commentary), Hermann of Carinthia, De Essentiis (Leiden: Brill, 1982).
  • H. L. L. Busard, The first Latin translation of Euclid’s ‘Elements’ commonly ascribed to Adelard of Bath: Books I–VIII and Books X.36–XV.2 (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1983 (Studies and texts)).
  • ───, Campanus of Novara and Euclid’s ‘Elements’ (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 2005 Boethius (Series)).
  • ───, The Latin translation of the Arabic version of Euclid’s ‘Elements’ commonly ascribed to Gerard of Cremona (Leiden: Brill, 1984 (Asfār)).
  • ───, The translation of the ‘Elements’ of Euclid from the Arabic into Latin by Hermann of Carinthia (?), Books VII–XII (Amsterdam: Mathematisch Centrum, 1977 (Mathematical Centre tracts)).
  • Baynard Dodge (ed.), The Fihrist of al-Nadim: A Tenth-Century Survey of Muslim Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 1970).
  • Prescott N. Dunbar & G. A. Loud (trans. & eds), Amato di Montecassino, The History of the Normans (New York: Boydell Press, 2004).
  • Pascual de Gayangos (trans.), Ahmed ibn Mohammed al-Makkari, The History of the Mohammedan Dynasties in Spain, Volume I (London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2002).
  • Phyllis Gordon & Walter Goodhart (trans.), Two Renaissance Book Hunters: The Letters of Poggius Bracciolini to Nicolaus de Niccolis (New York: Columbia University Press, 1974).
  • Edward Grant, A Source Book in Medieval Science (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1974).
  • Mark Grant (ed.), Galen on Food and Diet (London: Routledge, 2000).
  • Robert Graves (trans.), Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars (London: Penguin Books, 1957).
  • Sir Thomas L. Heath (trans.), The Thirteen Books of Euclid’s ‘Elements’ (2nd ed.: New York: Dover Publications, 1956).
  • Ian Johnston, Galen On Diseases and Symptoms (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).
  • Horace Leonard Jones (trans.), The Geography of Strabo (London: Heinemann, 1932 (Loeb Edition)).
  • Leslie Webber Jones (trans. & ed.), Cassiodorus, Senator, ca. 487–ca. 580, An Introduction to Divine and Human Readings (New York: W. W. Norton, 1969).
  • Graham Loud (trans.), Roger II and the Creation of the Kingdom of Sicily (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2012).
  • Paul Lunde & Caroline Stone (trans. & eds), Mas‘udi, The Meadows of Gold: The Abbasids (London: Kegan Paul International, 1989).
  • O. Neugebauer (trans.), The astronomical tables of al-Khwārizmi: translation with commentaries of the Latin version edited by H. Suter (KØbenhavn: I kommission hos Munksgaard, 1962).
  • Vivian Nutton (ed., trans. & comm.), Galen: On my own opinions (Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 1999).
  • ───, Galen: On prognosis (Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 1979).
  • Harriet Pratt Lattin (trans. & intro.), The Letters of Gerbert: With His Papal Privileges as Sylvester II (New York: Columbia University Press, 1961).
  • Sema‘an I. Salem & Alok Kumar (trans. & eds), Sa‘id al-Andalusi, Science in the Medieval World: ‘Book of the Categories of Nations’ (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1996).
  • E. R. A. Sewter (trans.), The Alexiad of Anna Comnena (London: Penguin Books, 1969).
  • M. S. Spink & G. L. Lewis (trans. & comm.), Albucasis on Surgery and Instruments: A Definitive Edition of the Arabic Text with English Translation and Commentary (London: Wellcome Institute of the History of Medicine, 1973).
  • G. J. Toomer (trans.), Ptolemy’s Almagest (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998).
  • John Alden Williams (trans.), al-Tabari, The Early Abbasi Empire, Volume I (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988).

مصادر ثانوية

  • David Abulafia (ed.), Italy in the Central Middle Ages 1000–1300 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
  • Peter Ackroyd, Venice: Pure City (London: Vintage, 2010).
  • ‘Ahmad Azīz, A History of Islamic Sicily (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1975).
  • Herbert Bloch, Monte Cassino in the Middle Ages, Volume I (Rome: Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 1986).
  • Dirk Booms & Peter Higgs, Sicily: Culture and Conquest (London: The British Museum Press, 2016).
  • S. Brentjes & J. Ren (eds), Globalization of Knowledge in the Post-Antique Mediterranean, 700–1500 (London: Routledge, 2016).
  • Jerry Brotton, A History of the World in Twelve Maps (London: Allen Lane, 2012).
  • P. Brown, Late Antiquity (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1998).
  • Charles Burnett, ‘The Coherence of the Arabic-Latin Translation Program in Toledo in the Twelfth Century’, Science in Context 14 (1/2) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001).
  • ───, The Introduction of Arabic Learning into England, The Panizzi Lectures 1996 (London: The British Library, 1997).
  • ───, Adelard of Bath: An English Scientist and Arabist of the Early Twelfth Century (London: Warburg Institute, 1987).
  • Charles Burnett & D. Jacquart, Constantine the African and ‘Alīibn al-‘Abbās al-Mağūsī: The Pantegni and Related Texts (Leiden: Brill, 1994).
  • Averil Cameron, Bryan Ward-Perkins & Michael Whitby (eds), The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume XIV (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).
  • Luciano Canfora, The Vanished Library: A Wonder of the Ancient World (London: Vintage, 1991).
  • Pietro Capparoni, ‘Magistri Salernitani Nondum Cogniti’: A Contribution to the History of the Medical School of Salerno (London: John Bale, 1923).
  • Louise Cochrane, Adelard of Bath: The First English Scientist (London: British Museum Press, 1994).
  • Roger Collins, Early Medieval Spain, Unity in Diversity 400–1000 (London: Macmillan, 1983).
  • Roger Collins & Anthony Goodman (eds), Medieval Spain: Culture, Conflict, and Coexistence: Studies in Honour of Angus MacKay (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002).
  • O. R. Constable, Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean World: Lodging, Trade, and Travel in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003).
  • ───, Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997).
  • M. Cook (ed.), The New Cambridge History of Islam (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010).
  • Michael Cooperson, Al-Ma’mun (Oxford: Oneworld, 2006).
  • Serafina Cuomo, Ancient Mathematics (London: Routledge, 2001).
  • Sarah Davis-Secord, Where Three Worlds Met: Sicily in the Early Medieval Mediterranean (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2017).
  • S. E. al-Djazairi, The Golden Age and Decline of Islamic Civilization (Manchester: Bayt Al-Hikma Press, 2006).
  • Reinhart Dozy, Spanish Islam: A History of the Moslems in Spain (London: Chatto & Windus, 1913).
  • Peter Dronke, The History of Twelfth-Century Western Philosophy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988).
  • Eric Dursteler (ed.), A Companion to Venetian History 1400–1797 (Leiden: Brill, 2013).
  • Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications and Cultural Transformations in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979).
  • Joanne M. Ferraro, Venice: History of the Floating City (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012).
  • Richard Fletcher, Moorish Spain (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006).
  • Menso Folkerts, The Development of Mathematics in Medieval Europe: The Arabs, Euclid, Regiomontanus (Aldershot: Ashgate Variorum, 2006).
  • ───, Essays on Early Medieval Mathematics: The Latin Tradition (Aldershot: Ashgate Variorum, 2003).
  • Michael Frampton, Embodiments of Will: Anatomical and Physiological Theories of Voluntary Animal Motion from Greek Antiquity to the Latin Middle Ages, 400 B.C.–A.D. 1300 (Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag Dr Müller, 2008).
  • P. M. Fraser, Ptolemaic Alexandria (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972).
  • L. García Ballester, Practical Medicine from Salerno to the Black Death (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993).
  • ───, Galen and Galenism: Theory and Medical Practice from Antiquity to the European Renaissance (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002).
  • A. L. Gascoigne, L. V. Hicks & M. O’Doherty (eds), Journeying Along Medieval Routes in Europe and the Middle East (Belgium: Brepols, 2016).
  • Deno John Geanakoplos, Greek Scholars in Venice: Studies in the Dissemination of Greek Learning from Byzantium to Western Europe (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1962).
  • E. Michael Gerli (ed.), Medieval Iberia: An Encyclopedia (London: Routledge, 2003).
  • Leonardas Vytautas Gerulaitis, Printing and Publishing in Fifteenth Century Venice (Chicago: American Library Association, 1976).
  • Christopher Gill, Tim Whitmarsh & John Wilkins, Galen and the World of Knowledge (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009).
  • Charles Coulston Gillispie, Frederic Lawrence Holmes & Noretta Koertge (eds), Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography (Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2008).
  • Anthony Grafton (ed.), Rome Reborn, The Vatican Library and Renaissance Culture (London: Yale University Press, 1993).
  • Edward Grant, Physical Science in the Middle Ages (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1971).
  • Gerd Grasshoff, The History of Ptolemy’s Star Catalogue (London: Springer Verlag, 1990).
  • Barbara Graziosi, Vasunia Phiroze & G. R. Boys-Stones (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Hellenic Studies (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).
  • Stephen Greenblatt, The Swerve: How the Renaissance Began (London: Bodley Head, 2011).
  • Dimitri Gutas, Greek Thought, Arabic Culture: The Graeco-Arabic Translation Movement in Baghdad and Early Abbasid Society (2nd–4th/8th–10th centuries) (Oxford: Routledge, 1998).
  • Jaqueline Hamesse & Marta Fattori, Rencontres des Cultures dans la Philosophie Médiévale (Louvain-la-Neuve: Cassino, 1990).
  • R. J. Hankinson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Galen (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).
  • Charles Homer Haskins, The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1927).
  • ───, Studies in the History of Mediaeval Science (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1924).
  • Lotte Hellinga, Texts in Transit: Manuscript to Proof and Print in the Fifteenth Century (Leiden: Brill, 2014).
  • Hubert Houben, Roger II of Sicily: A Ruler Between East and West (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).
  • G. L. Irby-Massie (ed.), A Companion to Science, Technology, and Medicine in Ancient Greece and Rome (Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2016).
  • Salma Khadra Jayyusi, The Legacy of Muslim Spain, Volumes 1 & 2 (Leiden: Brill, 1992).
  • S. K. Jayyusi, R. Holod, A. Petruccioli & A. Raymond, The City in the Islamic World (Leiden: Brill, 2008).
  • Hugh Kennedy, Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of Al-Andalus (London: Longman, 1996).
  • ───, When Baghdad Ruled the Muslim World: The Rise and Fall of Islam’s Greatest Dynasty (Boston: Da Capo Press, 2005).
  • Jim al-Khalili, The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance (London: Penguin, 2010).
  • Thomas Khun, The Copernican Revolution (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1957).
  • Helmut Koester, Pergamon: Citadel of the Gods (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Trinity Press International, 1998).
  • Jason König, Katerina Oikonomopoulou & Greg Woolf (eds), Ancient Libraries (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).
  • Paul Oskar Kristeller, ‘The School of Salerno: its development and its contribution to the history of learning’, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Vol. 17 (1945) Feb., No. 2.
  • Paul Kunitzsch, The Arabs and the Stars: Texts and Traditions on the Fixed Stars, and their Influence in Medieval Europe (Northampton: Variorum Reprints, 1989).
  • Lottie Labowsky, Bessarion’s Library and the Biblioteca Marciana (Rome: Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 1979).
  • Jacob Lassner, The Topography of Baghdad in the Early Middle Ages: Text and Studies (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1970).
  • Brian Lawn, Salernitan Questions (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1963).
  • A. C. Leighton, Transport and Communication in Early Medieval Europe, AD 500–1100 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1972).
  • David C. Lindberg, The Beginnings of Western Science: The European Scientific Tradition in Philosophical, Religious, and Institutional Context, 600 B.C. to A.D. 1450 (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1992).
  • David C. Lindberg & Michael H. Shank (eds), The Cambridge History of Science, Volume 2: Medieval Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).
  • Martin Lowry, The World of Aldus Manutius: Business and Scholarship in Renaissance Venice (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1979).
  • Angus MacKay, Spain in the Middle Ages: From Frontier to Empire, 1000–1500 (London: Macmillan, 1977).
  • Roy Macleod (ed.), The Library of Alexandria: Centre of Learning in the Ancient World (London: I. B. Tauris, 2000).
  • M. R. McVaugh & V. Pasche, Sciences at the Court of Frederick II (Belgium: Brepols, 1994).
  • Justin Marozzi, Baghdad: City of Peace, City of Blood (London: Allen Lane, 2014).
  • John Jeffries Martin, Venice Reconsidered: The History and Civilisation of an Italian City State, 1297–1797 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000).
  • María Rosa Menocal, Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain (London: Little, Brown, 2002).
  • Elizabeth Nash, Sevilla, Córdoba and Granada: A Cultural and Literary History (Oxford: Signal Books, 2005).
  • Catherine Nixey, The Darkening Age: The Christian Destruction of the Classical World (London: Macmillan, 2017).
  • John Julius Norwich, A History of Venice (London: Penguin, 2012).
  • Vivian Nutton, The Unknown Galen (London: Institute of Classical Studies, 2002).
  • ───, Ancient Medicine (London: Taylor & Francis, 2004).
  • Norbert Ohler, The Medieval Traveller (Martlesham, Suffolk: Boydell Press, 1989).
  • Katherine Park & Lorraine Daston (eds), The Cambridge History of Science, Volume 3: Early Modern Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016).
  • O. Pedersen & A. Jones, A Survey of the Almagest (New York: Springer, 2011).
  • H. L. Pinner, The World of Books in Classical Antiquity (Leiden: A. W. Sijthoff, 1948).
  • O. Pinto, ‘The Libraries of the Arabs during the time of the Abbasids’, Islamic Culture 3, 1929.
  • Leon Poliakov, The History of Anti-Semitism, Volume 2: From Mohammed to the Marranos (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003).
  • Peter Pormann & Emilie Savage-Smith, Medieval Islamic Medicine (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007).
  • Plinio Prioreschi, A History of Medicine, Volume 5: Medieval Medicine (Omaha, Nebraska: Horatius Press, 2005).
  • R. Rashed & R. Morelon (eds), Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science (London: Routledge, 1995).
  • G. R. Redgrave & E. Ratdolt, Erhard Ratdolt and his Work at Venice (London: Bibliographical Society, 1894).
  • Neil Rhodes & Jonathan Sawday, The Renaissance Computer: Knowledge Technology in the First Age of Print (London: Routledge, 2000).
  • R. T. Risk, Erhard Ratdolt, Master Printer (Francestown, New Hampshire: Typographeum, 1982).
  • E. Robson & J. A. Stedall, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).
  • Stephan Roman, The Development of Islamic Library Collections in Western Europe and North America (London: Mansell, 1990).
  • Paul Lawrence Rose, The Italian Renaissance of Mathematics: Studies on Humanists and Mathematicians from Petrarch to Galileo (Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1975).
  • Franz Rosenthal, The Classical Heritage in Islam (London: Routledge, 1994).
  • D. F. Ruggles, Islamic Gardens and Landscapes (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).
  • George Sarton, Six Wings: Men of Science in the Renaissance (London: Bodley Head, 1958).
  • ───, Introduction to the History of Science (Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1927).
  • George Saliba, Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2007).
  • P. Skinner, Health and Medicine in Early Medieval Southern Italy (Leiden: Brill, 1997).
  • Richard Southern, The Making of the Middle Ages (London: Pimlico, 1993).
  • Konstantinos Sp. Staikos, The History of the Library in Western Civilization (six volumes) (New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2004–13).
  • Lynn Thorndike, History of Magic and Experimental Science (New York: Macmillan, 1923).
  • Colin Thubron, The Shadow of the Silk Road (London: Vintage, 2007).
  • J. V. Tolan, Petrus Alfonsi and his Medieval Readers (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993).
  • S. Torallas Tovar & J. P. Monferrer Sala, Cultures in Contact: Transfer of Knowledge in the Mediterranean Context: Selected Papers (Spain: CNERU, 2013).
  • H. Touati & L. G. Cochrane, Islam & Travel in the Middle Ages (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).
  • C. J. Tuplin & T. E. Rihll (eds), Science and Mathematics in Ancient Greek Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).
  • Gerald P. Tyson & Sylvia S. Wagonheim (eds), Print and Culture in the Renaissance: Essays on the Advent of Printing in Europe (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1986).
  • Faith Wallis, Medieval Medicine: A Reader (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010).
  • W. M. Watt, The Influence of Islam on Medieval Europe (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1994).
  • Olga Weijers (ed.), Vocabulary of Teaching and Research Between Middle Ages and Renaissance: Proceedings of the Colloquium, London, Warburg Institute, 11-12 March 1994 (Turnhout: Brepols, 1995).
  • G. Wiet & S. Feiler, Baghdad: Metropolis of the Abbasid caliphate (Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971).
  • M. Wilks, The World of John of Salisbury (London: Blackwell, 1994).
  • N. G. Wilson, Scholars of Byzantium (London: Duckworth, 1983).
  • ───, From Byzantium to Italy: Greek Studies in the Italian Renaissance (London: Duckworth, 1992).
  • ───  (ed. & trans.), Aldus Manutius: The Greek Classics (Harvard: Harvard University Press, 2016).
  • David S. Zeidberg (ed.), Aldus Manutius and Renaissance Culture: Essays in Memory of Franklin D. Murphy (Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 1994).

مصادر على شبكة الإنترنت

جميع الحقوق محفوظة لمؤسسة هنداوي © ٢٠٢٠