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قائمة الأفلام

  • The Private Life of Helen of Troy (1927) dir. Alexander Korda.
  • Helen of Troy (1955) dir. Robert Wise.
  • Helen of Troy (2003) dir. John Kent Harrison.
  • Troy (2004) dir. Wolfgang Petersen.
  • Raphael, F. (1979) Of Mycenae and Men, dir. Hugh David.
  • The Truth about Cats and Dogs (1996), dir. Michael Lehmann.

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