المراجع والملاحظات

المادة التمهيدية والتحضيرية

  • And now in age is from George herbert’s “The Flower” (1633), in The Complete Poetry, edited by John Drury (penguin, london, 2015).
  • Gilbert White’s journal entries on Timothy the tortoise are in The Journals, edited by Francesca Greenoak (century, london, 3 vols, 1986–9). See also Gilbert White’s Year: Passages from “The Garden Kalendar” and “The Naturalist’s Journal”, selected by John commander (oxford University press, oxford, 1982); Sylvia Townsend Warner, The Portrait of a Tortoise (chatto & Windus, london, 1946).
  • Albert camus, “Summer in Algiers” (1954), in Selected Essays and Notebooks, edited and translated by philip Thody (penguin, london, 1979).
  • elizabeth Bishop, “The Sandpiper”, in Poems (chatto & Windus, london, 2011). Bishop’s words on her poem are quoted in colm Tóibín, On Elizabeth Bishop (princeton University press, princeton and Woodstock, 2015). See also Mark Ford, “elizabeth Bishop’s Aviary”, London Review of Books, 29 november 2007.
  • W. S. Merwin, “Shore Birds”, in Selected Poems (Bloodaxe, hexham, 2007).
  • On surfing the green wave see Ellen O. Aikens, Mathew J. Kauffman, Jerod A. Merkle, Samantha P. H. Dwinnell, Gary L. Fralick and Kevin l. Monteith, “The greenscape shapes surfing of resource waves in a large migratory herbivore”, Ecology Letters 20: 741–50 (2014); Brett R. Jesmer, Jerod A. Merkle, Jacob R. Goheen, Ellen O. Aikens, Jeffrey L. Beck, Alyson B. Courtemanch, Mark A. Hurley, Douglas E. McWhirter, Hollie M. Miyasaki, Kevin L. Monteith and Matthew J. Kauffman, “Is ungulate migration culturally transmitted? Evidence of social learning from translocated animals”, Science 361: 1023–5 (2018).
  • On the speed of spring see maps of the ten degrees Celsius isotherm in Ian Newton, Bird Migration (Collins, London, 2010). See also Robin Robertson’s poem “primavera”, in John Burnside and Maurice Riordan (eds), Wild Reckoning (Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, london, 2004).
  • James Pearce-Higgins, “Birds and climate change”, British Birds 110: 388–404 (2017).
  • Robert herrick, “Corinna’s Going a Maying”, in Poet to Poet: Selected Poems, edited by Stephen Romer (Faber, London, 2010).
  • John Stow on May Day is quoted in Christopher Logue (ed.), London in Verse (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1984).
  • Now each holt is from Lavinia Greenlaw, A Double Sorrow: Troilus and Criseyde (Faber, London, 2015).
  • Theodore Roethke, “The Far Field”, in Collected Poems (Doubleday Anchor, New York, 1990).
  • Rainer Maria Rilke’s line O Earth on holiday is from “Spring”, in Orpheus: A Version of Rilke’s “Die Sonette an Orpheus”, translated by Don Paterson (Faber, London, 2006).
  • Robert Lowell, “Brunetto latini”, in Collected Poems, edited by Frank Bidart and David Gewanter (Faber, London, 2008). The poem was first published in Lowell’s collection Near the Ocean (1967). His version of Horace, “Spring”, is in the same book. Lowell is the greenest of poets: the word green must outnumber any other colour by ten to one in his poems.
  • George Orwell, “Some thoughts on the common toad”, first published in Tribune, 12 April 1946, reprinted in Narrative Essays (Harvill Secker, London, 2009).
  • world’s morning is from D. H. Lawrence’s letter no. 1,958 from Sicily. Lawrence’s letters throughout are quoted from The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, edited by James T. Boulton and others (8 vols, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1970–2001).
  • John Keats, “Ode to a Nightingale”, in John Keats, edited by Elizabeth Cook (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1990).
  • simple flowers and flowers growing over are from letters from Joseph Severn to William Haslam, including one written the day before Keats’ death, 22 February 1821; see Life and Letters of Joseph Severn, edited by William Sharp (Sampson Low, Marston, London, 1892). Severn said violets were Keats’ favourites and that they grew in the graveyard in Rome.
  • Spitting out blood is from Robert lowell, “Picture in the Literary Life, a Scrapbook”, in Collected Poems, op. cit.
  • Henry David Thoreau, The Journal of Henry David Thoreau, 1837–1861, edited by Damion Searls (New York Review Books, New York, 2009).
  • José Ortega y Gasset is quoted in W. H. Auden, A Certain World: A Commonplace Book (Faber, London, 1971).
  • Look deep into nature: Albert Einstein’s remark is widely quoted—most recently I found it on the label of a sporty woollen T-shirt.
  • transport of cordiality is from Emily Dickinson’s poem which begins “Several of nature’s people”, in The Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Ralph W. Franklin (Belknap Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1998). Dickinson’s handwriting was described by Thomas Wentworth Higginson as being like fossil-bird tracks.
  • Nadine Gordimer, The Conservationist (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1983).
  • W. S. Merwin, “Threshold”, in Selected Poems, op. cit.
  • Shakespeare quotations throughout are from Complete Works: The RSC Shakespeare, edited by Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen (Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, 2008).
  • giant memory of one known longitude is from Robert Lowell, “For Elizabeth Bishop 2: Castine, Maine”, in Collected Poems, op. cit. The poem was first published in Lowell’s collection History (1973).
  • the buzz of earth is from an untitled poem dated 8 February 1937 in Osip Mandelshtam, Selected Poems, translated by James Greene (Penguin, London, 1991). The poem was published posthumously. Mandelstam died aged forty-seven on 27 December 1938 in a transit camp near Vladivostok.
  • John Buxton, The Redstart (Collins, London, 1950).
  • time is the fire is from Delmore Schwartz, “Calmly We Walk through This April’s Day”, in Selected Poems(1938–1958): Summer Knowledge (New Directions, New York, 1967).
  • John clare, “The Firetail’s Nest”, in Simon Armitage and Tim Dee (eds), The Poetry of Birds (Penguin, London, 2009).
  • Birds return is from Robert lowell, “Spring”, in Collected Poems, op. cit. The poem, a version of Horace’s Odes I.4, was first published in Lowell’s collection Imitations (1960).
  • Thick flies is from Robert Burns, “Song in Autumn”, in Selected Poems and Songs, edited by Robert P. Irvine (Oxford University press, Oxford, 2014).

ديسمبر ويناير

  • slant is a word in Emily Dickinson’s poem no. 1,263, which begins “Tell all the truth but tell it slant –/Success in circuit lies”, in The Poems of Emily Dickinson, op. cit.
  • Patrick McGuinness, “Blue Guide, 1, Gare du Nord”, in Christopher Ricks (ed.) Joining Music with Reason (Waywiser Press, Chipping Norton, 2010).

فبراير

  • Aimé Césaire, Return to My Native Land, translated by John Berger and Anna Bostock (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1969). Translation slightly amended.
  • Louis MacNeice, “All over Again”, in Collected Poems, edited by Peter McDonald (Faber, London, 2006).
  • Rainer Maria Rilke’s line The word is old is adapted from “Cycles”, in Orpheus, op. cit.
  • The birds of Chad are described and illustrated in Nik Borrow and Ron Demey, Birds of Western Africa (Christopher Helm, London, 2001). For present-day life histories of European migrants in the Sahel and south Sahara see Leo Zwarts, Rob G. Bijlsma, Jan van der Kamp and Eddy Wymenga, Living on the Edge: Wetlands and Birds in a Changing Sahel (KNNV, Zeist, 2010).
  • tawny grammar is a phrase coined out of Spanish by Henry David Thoreau in his essay “Walking”: see The Portable Thoreau, edited by Jeffrey S. Cramer (Penguin, New York, 2012); Gary Snyder wrote an essay with this title which has put Thoreau’s phrase into the modern world.
  • Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s orange trees and captive gazelles are in Wind, Sand and Stars, translated by William Rees (Penguin, London, 2000). First published in 1939 as Terre des hommes.
  • Tomas Tranströmer, “Upright”, in The Half-Finished Heaven: the best Poems of Tomas Tranströmer, translated by Robert Bly (Graywolf, St Paul, Minnesota, 2001).
  • Charles Darwin, “An account of the fine dust which often falls on vessels in the Atlantic ocean”, Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London 2: 26–30 (1846). Darwin wrote: “The little packet of dust collected by myself would not have filled a quarter of a tea-spoon, yet it contains seventeen forms.”
  • Amato T. evan, Cyrille Flamant, Marco Gaetani and Françoise Guichard, “The past, present and future of African dust”, Nature 531, 493–5 (2016).
  • D. H. Lawrence, “The Gazelle calf”, in The Complete Poems of D. H. Lawrence, edited by Vivian de Sola Pinto and Warren F. Roberts (Penguin, London, 1994). All Lawrence’s poetry quoted is from this edition.
  • Dorothy Wordsworth, The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals, edited by Pamela Woof (Oxford University press, oxford, 2008).
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge, notebook entry, 18 June 1801; all Coleridge’s notes quoted here are from The Notebooks of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (the Bollingen Series L edition), edited by Kathleen coburn and others (5 vols, Routledge, London, 1957–2002). The single-volume Coleridge’s Notebooks: A Selection, edited by Seamus Perry (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002), is portable and well annotated.
  • When I was a boy is from peter Reading, C (Secker & Warburg, London, 1984). Again the Homeric dream is from peter Reading, Faunal (Bloodaxe, Hexham, 2002).
  • Michael longley, “The Bed of leaves”, in The Ghost Orchid (Cape, London, 1995).
  • The rock paintings of the Ennedi massif are described and illustrated in Roberta Simonis, Adrian Ravenna and Pier Paolo Rossi, Ennedi: pierres historiées, translated by Jean-Loïc le Quellec (Edizioni all’Insegna del Giglio in Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, 2017).
  • Little trotty wagtail is in John Clare, edited by Eric Robinson and David Powell (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1984).
  • Ronald Johnson, The Book of the Green Man (Longmans, Green, London, 1967). Re-published by Uniformbooks (Axminster, 2015), this is a remarkable and too little-known collection of poetry and highly recommended.
  • Whát I do is me: for that I came is from Gerard Manley Hopkins, “As Kingfishers Catch Fire”, in The Major Works, edited by Catherine Phillips (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2009).
  • If I am pressed to say is quoted and discussed in Sarah Bakewell, How to Live, or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer (Chatto & Windus, London, 2010).

مارس

  • Edward Thomas, “Thaw”, in Collected Poems (Faber, London, 2004).
  • Barrie E. Juniper and David J. Mabberley, The Story of the Apple (Timber Press, Portland, Oregon, 2006).
  • The Roman story of the golden bough (Aeneas instructed to carry the ever-growing branch as a token for admission to the underworld and an audience with Proserpina) was told most famously in Virgil’s Aeneid, but also appeared in several other versions in the ancient Mediterranean world. Among the translations of Virgil’s passage are C. H. Sisson’s in Collected Translations (Carcanet, Manchester, 1996) and Seamus Heaney’s in Aeneid, Book VI (Faber, London, 2016). See also J. M. W. Turner’s golden-shimmer painting Lake Avernus — The Fates and the Golden Bough in the Tate collection. “Avernus” means birdless — this imagined entrance to the underworld was a toxic lake which poisoned anything flying over. Lake Avernus is north of Naples. South of Rome, in 2010, an ancient stone-walled enclosure was found that perhaps fenced and protected a huge cypress or oak tree; here, it was speculated, grew the tree that grew the golden bough.
  • Eudora Welty, “Music from Spain”, in Stories, Essays and Memoir, edited by Richard Ford and Michael Kreyling (Library of America, New York, 1998).
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Aria Spontanea”, in Selected Poems, edited by Richard Holmes (HarperCollins, London, 1996). All Coleridge poems quoted are from this edition. Richard pointed me in the direction of this poem.
  • On bog bodies see p. V. Glob, The Bog People: Iron-Age Man Preserved, translated by Rupert Bruce-Mitford (Paladin, London, 1971), first published in Danish in 1965; Julia Blackburn, Time Song—Searching for Doggerland (Jonathan Cape, London, 2019); Christian Fischer, Tollund Man: Gift to the Gods (History Press, Stroud, 2012); Steven Mithen, After the Ice: A Global Human History, 20,000–5000 BC (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2006); Karin Sanders, Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination (University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 2012); Pauline Asingh, Grauballe Man: Portrait of a Bog Body (Moesgård Museum, Aarhus/Gyldendal, Copenhagen, 2009); and several Seamus Heaney poems, mostly in his collections Wintering Out (Faber, London, 1972) and North (Faber, London, 1975).
  • On the birds of Ethiopia see John Ash and John Atkins, Birds of Ethiopia and Eritrea: An Atlas of Distribution (Christopher Helm, London, 2009); Nigel Redman, John Fanshawe and Terry Stevenson, Birds of the Horn of Africa: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia, Socotra (Christopher Helm, London, 2011); and Claire Spottiswoode, Merid Nega Gabremichael and Julian Francis, Where to Watch Birds in Ethiopia (Christopher Helm, London, 2010).
  • R. E. Moreau, The Palaearctic—African Bird Migration Systems (Academic Press, London, 1972). Reg Moreau died in May 1970 before his book was published. he wrote at the end of his preface: “For reasons of health I should be surprised if I set eyes on reviews of this book. How delighted I should be if someone somewhere thought it “no bum swan-song”.”
  • Eschew luggage is from Peter Reading, “Apophthegmatic”, in Untitled (Bloodaxe, Hexham, 2001).
  • Marcus Tullius Cicero’s remark, of the philosopher Bias of Priene, one of the Seven Sages, is in Paradoxa Stoicorum I.8.
  • Teevo cheevo cheevio chee is Gerard Manley Hopkins’ transcription of a woodlark’s song, in his unfinished poem “The Woodlark”, in The Major Works, op. cit.
  • I have seen Africa is from Coleridge’s notebook entry for 19 April 1804. See also Alethea hayter, A Voyage in Vain: Coleridge’s Journey to Malta in 1804 (Robin Clark, London, 1993); Richard Holmes, Coleridge: Early Visions (Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1989); Richard Holmes Coleridge: Darker Reflections (HarperCollins, London, 1998).
  • no there there is from Gertrude Stein, Everybody’s Autobiography (Random House, New York, 1937).
  • On the avifauna of Gibraltar see Clive Finlayson, Birds of the Strait of Gibraltar (T. & A. D. Poyser, Calton, 1992). Gilbert White wrote of Gibraltar and of migration in The Natural History of Selborne (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1977), first published in 1789. he was never there but his brother was: see Paul Foster, “The Gibraltar collections: Gilbert White (1720–1793) and John White (1727–1780), and the naturalist and author Giovanni Antonio Scopoli (1723–1788)”, Archives of Natural History 34: 30–46 (2007).
  • Ana T. Marques, Carlos D. Santos, Frank Hanssen, Antonio-Román Muñoz, Alejandro Onrubia, Martin Wikelski, Francisco Moreira, Jorge Manuel Palmeirim and João P. Silva, “Wind turbines cause functional habitat loss for migratory soaring birds”, Journal of Animal Ecology doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12961 (2019).

أبريل

  • roundy head is quoted in Tom Paulin, Crusoe’s Secret: The Aesthetics of Dissent (Faber, London, 2005).
  • Steven Feld, Sound and Sentiment: Birds, Weeping, Poetics, and Song in Kaluli Expression (University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 1982).
  • Seamus Heaney, “The Blackbird of Glanmore”, in District and Circle (Faber, London, 2006).
  • Adam Zagajewski, “houston, 6 p.m.”, in Mysticism for Beginners, translated by Clare Cavanagh (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York, 1998).
  • Bertolt Brecht, “When in My White Room at the Charité”, in Poems 1913–1956, translated by John Willett and Ralph Manheim (3 vols, Eyre Methuen, London, 1976).
  • the navel is from Seamus Heaney, “Mossbawn, omphalos”, in Finders Keepers: Selected Prose 1971–2001 (Faber, London, 2002).
  • Seamus Heaney, “A Herbal”, in Human Chain (Faber, London, 2010).
  • Charles Darwin, On the Origin of Species, edited by Gillian Beer (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2008).
  • Marjorie C. Sorensen, Graham D. Fairhurst, Susanne Jenni-Eiermann, Jason Newton, Elizabeth Yohannes and Claire N. Spottiswoode, “Seasonal rainfall at long term migratory staging sites is associated with altered carry-over effects in a palaearctic–African migratory bird”, BMC Ecology 16: 41 (2016). See also Marjorie C. Sorensen, “Singing in Africa: no evidence for a long supposed function of winter song in a migratory songbird”, Behavioral Ecology 25: 909–15 (2014).
  • On willow warblers in Sweden and much else migratory see Ian Newton, Bird Migration, op. cit. This book and also Ian Newton’s The Migration Ecology of Birds (Academic Press, London, Burlington, Massachusetts, and San Diego, California, 2008) are highly recommended.
  • Seamus Heaney, “The Gravel Walks”, in The Spirit Level (Faber, London, 1996).
  • walking on air is from Dennis O’Driscoll, Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney (Faber, London, 2009).
  • Seamus Heaney, “The Underground”, in Station Island (Faber, London, 1984).
  • Seamus Heaney, “What Passed at Colonus”, New York Review of Books, 7 october 2004.
  • Seamus Heaney, “Digging”, in Death of a Naturalist (Faber, London, 1966).
  • Seamus Heaney, “In Time”, in New Selected Poems 1988–2013 (Faber, London, 2015).
  • Leonard Blomefield (formerly Jenyns), A Naturalist’s Calendar Kept at Swaffham Bulbeck, Cambridgeshire (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1903).
  • Vaslav Nijinsky is quoted in Jerry Mason (ed.), The Family of Children (Jonathan Cape, London, 1977).
  • On The Winter’s Tale see Wilbur Sanders, The Winter’s Tale: Critical Introduction to Shakespeare (Harvester Wheatsheaf, Hassocks, 1987); Jonathan Bate, Shakespeare and Ovid (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2001); Patricia Storace, “The “darkness and radiance” of the tale”, New York Review of Books, 12 May 2016.
  • Richard Mabey, Flora Britannica (Sinclair-Stevenson, London, 1996).
  • D. H. Lawrence, Sea and Sardinia, edited by Mara Kalnins (Penguin, London, 1999).
  • Mary Taylor Simeti, On Persephone’s Island: A Sicilian Journal (Vintage, New York, 1995).
  • Matthew Arnold, “Empedocles on Etna”, in Selected Poems and Prose, edited by Miriam Allott (Everyman, London, 1993).
  • Ian Hamilton, A Gift Imprisoned: The Poetic Life of Matthew Arnold (Bloomsbury, London, 1998).
  • John Milton, Paradise Lost, in The Major Works, edited by Stephen Orgel and Jonathan Goldberg (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2003).
  • Ovid, Metamorphoses, translated by Arthur Golding and edited by Madeleine Forey (Penguin, London, 2002). This translation was first published in 1567.
  • D. H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, edited by Michael Squires (Penguin, London, 1994).
  • Robert Frost, “A Servant to Servants”, in Collected Poems, Prose and Plays, edited by Richard Poirier and Mark Richardson (library of America, New York, 1995).
  • Ere your spring be gone … you grow old … those who cannot use the present is from Ben Jonson, The Alchemist, in The Alchemist and Other Plays, edited by Gordon Campbell (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2008).
  • the brief span of life is from Robert Lowell, “Spring”, in Collected Poems, op. cit.
  • J. W. Goethe, Italian Journey 1786–88, translated by W. H. Auden and elizabeth Mayer (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1970).
  • Ted Hughes, “The Rape of Proserpina”, in Tales from Ovid (Faber, London, 1997).
  • Heinrich Gätke, Heligoland as an Ornithological Observatory: The Result of Fifty Years’ Experience, translated by Rudolph Rosenstock (David Douglas, Edinburgh, 1895).
  • William eagle clarke, Studies in Bird Migration, (2 vols, Gurney & Jackson, London, 1912).
  • R. M. lockley, I Know an Island (Harrap, London, 1938).
  • Otto Herman’s list is quoted in Michael Walters, A Concise History of Ornithology: The Lives and Works of Its Founding Figures (Christopher Helm, London, 2003).
  • Carlo Rovelli, Seven Brief Lessons on Physics, translated by Simon carnell and Erica Segre (Penguin, London, 2016). First published in Italian in 2014.
  • Stefan Garthe, Verena peschko, Ulrike Kubetzki and Anna-Marie Corman, “Seabirds as samplers of the marine environment: a case study of northern gannets”, Ocean Science 13: 337–47 (2017).
  • Sebastian Conradt, “Der Basstölpel – Seevogel des Jahres 2016: Der Fluch des billigen Plastiks”, Seevögel 37(2): 4–13 (2016).
  • Coleridge’s 1798 North Sea crossing is recorded in his notebook and in a more worked-up form in Biographia Literaria, (2 vols, J. M. Dent, london, 1956).

مايو

  • William Empson, “Fairy Flight in A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, in Essays on Shakespeare, edited by David B. Pirie (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986). First published in 1979.
  • John Clare, “The Fern Owl’s Nest”, in John Clare, op. cit.
  • Alfred Newton, A Dictionary of Birds (Adam & Charles Black, London, 1896).
  • Elizabeth Bletsoe, “Birds of the Sherborne Missal”, in Landscape from a Dream (Shearsman, Bristol, 2008).
  • For woodcock facts see William Yarrell, A History of British Birds, 4th edition, revised by Alfred Newton and Howard Saunders (John Van Voorst, london, 1871–74); J. H. Gurney, Early Annals of Ornithology (H. F. & G. Witherby, London, 1921); Stanley Cramp (ed.), Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palaearctic, vol. 3 – Waders to Gulls (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1983); Kenneth Richmond, Birds in Britain (Odhams Press, London, 1962); William Wordsworth, The Prelude (1805), edited by Ernest de Selincourt and revised by Stephen Gill (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1978); Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina, translated by Rosamund Bartlett (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2016); W. B. Alexander, “The woodcock in the British Isles”, Ibis, 87: 512–50 (1945); David Lack, The Birds of Cambridgeshire (Cambridgeshire Bird Club, Cambridge, 1934); Gilbert White, The Natural History of Selborne, op. cit.
  • On green see Michel Pastoureau, Green: The History of a Color, translated by Jody Gladding (Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2014); Simon Schama, “Blue as can be”, New Yorker, 3 September 2018.
  • that greeny flower is from William Carlos Williams, “Asphodel, That Greeny Flower”, in Collected Poems, vol. 2: 1939–1962, edited by Christopher MacGowan (New Directions, New York, 1991).
  • how many colors is quoted in Sam Stephenson, Gene Smith’s Sink: A Wide- Angle View (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York, 2017).
  • Gertrude Stein, “Celery”, in Tender Buttons (claire Marie, New York, 1914).
  • Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet, translated by Charlie Louth (Penguin, London, 2014).
  • Thomas De Quincey, Recollections of the Lakes and the Lake Poets, edited by David Wright (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1971).
  • Don DeLillo, The Body Artist (Scribner, New York, 2002).
  • pihuqahtaq is from Frédéric Laugrand and Jarich Oosten, Hunters, Predators and Prey: Inuit Perceptions of Animals (Berghahn, New York, 2015).
  • The heavy bear and Time is the fire are from Delmore Schwartz, “The Heavy Bear Who Goes with Me” and “Calmly We Walk through This April Day” respectively, in Selected Poems (1938–1958), op. cit.
  • T. J. Clark, The Sight of Death: An Experiment in Art Writing (Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut, and London, 2006).
  • mountains are constantly walking is from Gary Snyder, Practice of the Wild (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York, 1990).
  • D. H. Lawrence, “Sketches from Etruscan Places”, in D. H. Lawrence and Italy, edited by Simonetta de Filippis, Paul Eggert and Mara Kalnins (Penguin, London, 2008).
  • He would sit, almost motionless is quoted in John Worthen, D. H. Lawrence: The Life of an Outsider (Penguin, London, 2006). In addition to this one-volume life, the three-volume Cambridge Biography of D. H. Lawrence by David ellis, John Worthen and Mark Kinkead-Weekes (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2014) is highly recommended; David Ellis, Death and the Author: How D. H. Lawrence Died, and Was Remembered (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2008) is also excellent.
  • I can’t recall that he ever broke a plate or a glass is quoted in D. H. Lawrence: A Critical Anthology, edited by harry coombes (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1973).
  • John Keats, “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, in John Keats, op. cit.
  • All those that ever went for a walk with him is quoted in D. H. Lawrence: A Critical Anthology, op. cit.
  • M. M. Mahood, The Poet as Botanist (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2015).
  • D. J. Enright is quoted in D. H. Lawrence: A Critical Anthology, op. cit.
  • different animal – in an essay about his childhood class Lawrence described himself as a “different animal” from the middle-class boys at Nottingham High School – see Mark Crees, “Another animal”, Times Literary Supplement, 18 March 2005.
  • glistening chaos is from Richard Holmes, Coleridge (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1990).
  • no passive tools is from Samuel Taylor coleridge, Biographia Literaria, op. cit.
  • William Hazlitt is quoted in the introduction to Nicholas Roe (ed.) English Romantic Writers and the West Country (Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, 2010).
  • On Wordsworth’s colour-blindness see Geoffrey Madan, Notebooks: A Selection, edited by J. A. Gere and John Sparrow (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1984).
  • On coleridge’s notes as fly-catchers see Walter Jackson Bate, Coleridge (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, 1969).
  • Natura is that which is about to be born is from Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection (George Bell, London, 1884). Adam Nicolson lent me this observation.
  • see to see is from Emily Dickinson, “I heard a Fly Buzz – When I Died”, in The Poems of Emily Dickinson, op. cit.
  • Elizabeth Bishop, One Art: Letters, edited by Robert Giroux (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, new York, 1995); on Bishop’s Darwin letter see Zachariah Pickard, “natural history and epiphany: elizabeth Bishop’s Darwin letter”, Twentieth-Century Literature 50(3): 268–82 (2004).
  • What you look hard at is from Gerard Manley Hopkins’ journal; quotations are from Gerard Manley Hopkins, Collected Works, vol. 3: Diaries, Journals and Notebooks, edited by Lesley Higgins (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2015) or The Note-Books and Papers of Gerard Manley Hopkins, edited by Humphry House (Oxford University Press, London, 1937).
  • R. F. Langley, Journals (Shearsman, Bristol, 2006).
  • Humphry House, Coleridge: The Clark Lectures 1951–52 (Rupert hart- Davis, london, 1953).
  • Gilbert White as a stationary man is mentioned in Don Gifford, The Farther Shore: A Natural History of Perception 1798–1985 (Faber, London, 1990).
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Selected Letters, edited by H. J. Jackson (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1988).
  • beasts of burden is from Henry David Thoreau, Walden, in The Portable Thoreau, op. cit.
  • Verde que ti quiero verde is from Federico García lorca, “Romance Sonambulo”, in Selected Poems, edited by Christopher Maurer (Penguin, London, 2001).
  • Philip Larkin, “The Trees”, in Collected Poems, edited by Anthony Thwaite (Faber, London, 2003).
  • Dorothy Wordsworth, The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals, op. cit.
  • On recent population trends in pied flycatchers and wood warblers see “Seeing the wood warblers for the trees”, British Birds 110: 302–3 (2017).
  • cloudage is Coleridge’s coinage in a notebook entry for 2 November 1803.
  • Ken Smith wrote about several journeys that we took together to the old and persisting borderlands of Hungary, Slovakia, Romania and Ukraine: see especially his Wire through the Heart (Ister, Budapest, 2000) and some poems in Shed: Poems 1980–2001 (Bloodaxe, Hexham, 2002).

يونيو

  • petrified curlew: see R. Rainbird Clarke, In Breckland Wilds (W. Heffer, Cambridge, 1937).
  • We are in Harar is from Arthur Rimbaud, Selected Poems and Letters, translated by Jeremy Harding and John Sturrock (Penguin, London, 2004); see also Graham Robb, Rimbaud (Picador, London, 2000).
  • Has the sailor gone? is quoted in V. S. Pritchett, Chekhov: A Biography (Penguin, London, 1990); see also Anton Chekhov, A Life in Letters, edited by Rosamund Bartlett and translated by Rosamund Bartlett and Anthony Phillips (Penguin, London, 2004).
  • Now comes good sailing: see David Markson, The Last Novel (Shoemaker & Hoard, Emeryville, California, 2007).
  • Illness has swallowed him is from The Journal of Katherine Mansfield, edited by John Middleton Murry (Albatross, Hamburg, 1933).
  • Quick, alive, vital is from David Ellis, D. H. Lawrence: Dying Game 1922–1930 (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997).
  • D. H. Lawrence, “A propos of Lady Chatterley’s Lover”, in A Selection from “Phoenix”, edited by A. A. H. Inglis (Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1979). First published 1930.
  • Walter Benjamin, “Franz Kafka: on the Tenth Anniversary of his Death”, in Illuminations, translated by Harry Zohn and edited by Hannah Arendt (Schocken, New York, 2007).
  • Felix Riede’s webpages at Aarhus University list his many papers and book contributions; see especially “Success and Failure during the Lateglacial Pioneer Human Re-colonisation of Southern Scandinavia”, in Felix Riede and Miikka Tallavaara (eds), Lateglacial and Postglacial Pioneers in Northern Europe (Archaeopress, Oxford, 2014); and “The Resettlement of Northern Europe”, in Vicki Cummings, Peter Jordan and Marek Zvelebil (eds), Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter-Gatherers (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014).
  • W. H. Auden, “The Fall of Rome”, in Collected Poems, edited by Edward Mendelson (Faber, London, 2007). See also Jill Cook, The Swimming Reindeer (British Museum Press, London, 2010); Jill Cook, Ice Age Art: Arrival of the Modern Mind (British Museum Press, London, 2013).
  • Nick (Nicholas) Tyler’s webpages at the Arctic University of Norway list his many papers and other reindeer publications; see especially David G. Hazlerigg and Nicholas Tyler, “Activity patterns in mammals: circadian dominance challenged”, PLoS Biology 17(7): e3000360 (2019); and Nicholas Tyler, Karl-Arne Stokkan, Chris Hogg, Christian Nellemann and Arnt Inge Vistnes, “Cryptic impact: visual detection of corona light and avoidance of power lines by reindeer”, Wildlife Society Bulletin 40: 50–58 (2016).
  • Lavinia Greenlaw, “Actaeon”, London Review of Books, 25 August 2011.
  • Karl-Arne Stokkan, Lars Folkow, Juliet Dukes, Magella Neveu, Chris Hogg, Sandra Siefken, Steven C. Dakin and Glen Jeffrey, “Shifting mirrors: adaptive changes in retinal reflections to winter darkness in Arctic reindeer”, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 280: 20132451 (2013).
  • These are the days that Reindeer love is from The Poems of Emily Dickinson, op. cit.
  • The Gundestrup cauldron is described and pictured in Poul Otto Nielsen, Danish Prehistory (Nationalmuseet, Copenhagen, 2016).
  • Robert Graves, The White Goddess: A Historical Grammar of Poetic Myth (Faber, London, 1961).
  • Wallace Stevens, “The plain Sense of Things”, in Collected Poems (Faber, London, 2006).
  • Franz Kafka, “Josefine, the Songstress or: The Mouse people”, in Metamorphosis and Other Stories, translated by Michael Hofmann (Penguin, London, 2008).
  • Tomas Tranströmer, “Below Freezing”, in The Half-Finished Heaven: the Best Poems of Tomas Tranströmer, op. cit.
  • Anders Pape Møller has published more on the barn swallow than probably all other swallow scientists put together. His Sexual Selection and the Barn Swallow (Oxford University Press, Oxford) appeared in 1994, and since then he has continued to publish on the bird as a result of his studies in Jutland and in Chernobyl. Many papers can be accessed online. See for example “The effect of dairy farming on barn swallow Hirundo rustica abundance, distribution and production”, Journal of Applied Ecology 38: 378–89 (2001); A. p. Møller, A. Barbosa, J. J. Cuervo, F. de Lope, S. Merino and N. Saino, “Sexual selection and tail streamers in the barn swallow”, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 265(1394): 409–14 (1998). I wrote on Anders at Chernobyl in Four Fields (Jonathan Cape, London, 2013). See also Angela Turner, The Barn Swallow (T. & A. D. Poyser, London, 2006).
  • the starnel crowds is from “Autumn evening”, in John Clare, op. cit.
  • I saw this dance one summer evening is quoted in Nigel Allenby Jaffé, Folk Dance of Europe (Folk Dance Enterprises, Kirby Malham, 1990).
  • Gabi (Gabriela) Wagner’s chronobiology papers (and David hazlerigg’s) are listed on the website of the Arctic University of Norway
  • David Abram, “Creaturely Migrations on a Breathing Planet”, Emergence 1, available at emergencemagacine.org.
  • Elisa Magnanelli, Øivind Wilhelmsen, Mario Acquarone, Lars P. Folkow and Signe Kjelstrup, “The nasal geometry of the reindeer gives energy-efficient respiration”, Journal of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics 42: 59–78 (2017).
  • Leo Tolstoy, “Strider”, in “Master and Man” and Other Stories, translated by Ronald Wilks and Paul Foote (Penguin, London, 2005).
  • Arild Johnsen, Staffan Andersson, Jonas Örnborg and Jan T. Lifjeld, “Ultraviolet plumage ornamentation affects social mate choice and sperm competition in bluethroats: a field experiment”, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 265(1403): 1313–18 (1998).

يوليو

  • So quick bright things come to confusion is said by Lysander in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • casual perfect is from Robert Lowell, “For elizabeth Bishop”, in Collected Poems, op. cit.

جميع الحقوق محفوظة لمؤسسة هنداوي © ٢٠٢٢