مراجع

الفصل الأول: مقدمة

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الفصل الثاني: ملكية بيئة الإعلام الجديدة والسيطرة عليها

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الفصل الثالث: وسائل الإعلام والديمقراطية

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الفصل الرابع: دراسة الثقافة الشائعة

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  • Liebes, Tamar, and Elihu Katz. 1993. The export of meaning: Cross-cultural readings of Dallas. Cambridge: Polity Press.
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الفصل الخامس: دراسة الفوارق الاجتماعية

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الفصل السادس: دراسة النصوص الإعلامية وتلقِّيها في بيئة الإعلام الجديدة

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الفصل السابع: خاتمة

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